Scientists invent spray-on battery

Scientists invent spray-on battery
Scientists in the United States have developed a paint that can store and deliver electrical power just like a battery.Traditional lithium-ion batteries power most portable electronics, and while already compact, they are limited to rectangular or cylindrical blocks.But researchers at Rice Univer…

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Do video games have a place in the classroom?

Do video games have a place in the classroom?
Thu 07 Jun 12, 14:00pm AEST

Stephanie Brantz

I know many parents question video games, but I wonder if they have ever stopped to consider their educational value? With the increasing variety of titles being custom made for the classroom such as Mathletics or Study Ladder it’s getting harder to ignore the benefits. Imagine how many factoids your 8 year old comes out with each week – how many might be gathered from the games they play? Possibly quite a lot more than you think! Games in their traditional form have long been a significant part of every school playground – I remember having great fun playing countless hours of bull rush and soccer with my classmates when I was at school. Using video games as a teaching tool is only an extension of something we’ve all been doing for a very long time. Whether the game has been created s…

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Telstra accused of tracking Next G internet use and sending this data offshore

Telstra accused of tracking Next G internet use
Wed 27 Jun 12, 20:08pm AEST

By Will Ockenden

Telstra has been accused of tracking the internet use of its Next G mobile phone users and sending their internet history to a company in the United States. One of the telco’s customers discovered that when he visited a website using his Next G network in Australia, a server in the United States would visit the same address almost instantly. Telstra says it is collecting the information for use in a new internet filter product, but internet users are outraged and are demanding the Australian Privacy Commissioner investigate. The tracking was confirmed by Mark Newton, who up until late last year was one of the longest serving technical engineers at Australian internet company Internode. When he saw rumours on a network administrator email list that Telstra was sending the URLs from…

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Telstra data tracking reminds us: You’re not alone online

Telstra data tracking reminds us: You’re not alone online
Wed 27 Jun 12, 17:56pm AEST

Alex Kidman

Telstra has been caught tracking the online usage of its “NextG” customers in preparation for what it calls a voluntary internet filtering system. It’s a stern reminder that whatever you do online is (or can be) watched. The issues surrounding online privacy are complex, wrapped up in layers of user expectations, reasonable (and sometimes unreasonable) business practices and laws that often trail the online reality. Telstra has been caught out tracking user activity based around its mobile broadband services, although it maintains that it’s doing so in an anonymous way. Or at least, it did so after first claiming that it wasn’t tracking anything at all. From a public relations perspective, at the very least, that is more than a slight mistake to make. The news first broke at the b…

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